The Methylation Pathway

Methylation is the process of controlled transfer of a methyl group (one carbon atom and three hydrogen atoms) onto amino acids, proteins, enzymes, and DNA in every cell and tissue of the body to regulate healing, cell energy, genetic expression of DNA, neurological function, liver detoxification, immunity, etc. This process is one of the essential metabolic functions of the body and is catalyzed by a variety of enzymes. Many case histories and several scientific articles have demonstrated that this methylation process is responsive to environmental conditions (toxic metals, organophosphates, infectious agents, etc.) and degrades with age, a process associated with a large variety of age-related disorders. Thus, with respect to the effect of methylation, it is a continuous struggle in life to adapt to the ever-changing environment. In fact, health and quality of life are highly dependent on the methylation process.

Methylation processes are central to the biochemical basis of the neuropsychiatry of folate and B12 metabolism.

The biochemical basis of the interrelationship between folate and cobalamine is the maintenance of two functions, nucleic acid synthesis and the methylation reactions. The latter is particularly important in the brain and relies especially on maintaining the concentration of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), which, in turn, maintains the methylation reactions whose inhibition is considered to cause cobalamine deficiency-associated neuropathy. Defective methylation processes can lead to a number of serious health conditions. A simple abnormality in the methylation pathway, compounded with further assaults from environmental and infectious agents (including Borrelia), can lead to a wide range of conditions including cardiovascular disease, neurotransmitter imbalances, cancer, diabetes, abnormal immune function, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), multiple sclerosis (MS), cognitive dysfunction in patients with dementia, neurological and psychiatric disorders, Alzheimers disease (AD), Down syndrome, autism, neural tube defects, and chronic inflammation.

Methylation Pathway Parameters Tested:

Glutathione (oxidized), Glutathione (reduced), S-adenosyl-methionine (RBC), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (RBC), Tetrahydrofolate (THE), 5-methyl-THF, 10-forrnyl-THF, 5-formyl-THF, Folic Acid, Folinic Acid, Folic Acid (RBC), Adenosine